Historical Marker honoring JuneTeenth. ...

It’s #Juneteenth! Although President Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation declared that slaves in the southern states were free, it took the end of the Civil War for the new law of the land to be enforced. On June 19, 1865, Union Gen. Gordon Granger read "General Order No. 3" from his headquarters in Galveston, declaring, "in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired labor." The roughly 250,000 slaves in Texas received news of emancipation over the course of several months following the end of the Civil War. Early celebrations of Emancipation Day, or Juneteenth, observed the anniversary and served as educational opportunities. Although Juneteenth celebrations grew in size and number after the Civil War, the early- to mid-20th century saw a transition from more public displays to private and personal observances. During the latter half of the 20th century, Juneteenth observances re-emerged as more public in nature, growing into an annual worldwide celebration. A historical marker commemorating Juneteenth was dedicated in Galveston in 2014. Celebrate Juneteenth and learn more about the history with this video produced for our African Americans in Texas mobile tour: youtu.be/OdMW6-xUZ28?list=PLONbbv2pt4cqLa-lzot8akVTOPtU16waD. #MarkerMonday